NEWTOWN SQUARE FIRE COMPANY AUXILIARY 69th SEMI ANNUAL FLEA MARKET

Saturday, 18 April 2015 13:31

NEWTOWN SQUARE FIRE COMPANY AUXILIARY 69th SEMI ANNUAL FLEA MARKET:

Spring is here! Time for our Spring Semi Annual Flea Market. There are still a few spots left if you would like to be a vendor. Or, just come out for a nice day of browsing for treasures.

Date: Sunday - April 26, 2015 (Rain Date: Mary 3, 2015)

Selling Time: form 9:00am to 3:00 pm

Where do you register? Glad you asked. Click here to find the Registration Form.

 

Safety Tips For Home

Friday, 03 April 2015 15:20

Unlike adults the curious minds of children rarely “see” dangers in and around a home. The Newtown Square Fire Company stresses there are at least four ways to help adults modify a home for the safety of children. The simplest method is crawling on the floor. From this vantage, an adult can view the same world as seen by a child—seeing the temptations created by the curiosity children.

A second method is to watch what children do both in play and general activities. As a father of older children, Chief Doug Everlof remembers, “They are too young to know about the dangers in life.” Often demonstrated by their climbing, children love to explore. Their mountains can be as simple as an open oven door, an easily opened chest of drawers, or a chair that gives access to climbing to see a wanted item.

Newer stoves include methods to anchor them to a wall, preventing them from tipping over. Homeowners can create ways to anchor tippable furniture. Another safety suggestion is remove heavy objects like a television set from the top of a chest of drawers. A similar suggestion is a reminder to place heavy storable items in the lowest drawer.

Chief Everlof volunteered, “According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every two weeks a child dies in our country from furniture, appliances or TVs tipping over. Each of us can help prevent these tragedies and make our homes a safer place.

A third method may be the most difficult. With maturity, adults see life in different ways than children. Try to ‘look back’ and begin to see life as a child and by returning to the adult world, remove the dangers we as adults have neglected to eliminate.

The final step suggests looking for lists and articles addressing items that need to be changed or eliminated to keep the home safe. One hint is to follow a trend being used in an increasing of stores and public gatherings—adding safety covers to all child-accessible electric outlets.

 

Walk The Yard

Sunday, 29 March 2015 13:03

As soon as the last of winter-spring snows melts, common sense dictates a safety requirement of “Walking the Yard” before the weather can produced one of the audible signs of spring—the easily recognized sound of a lawn mower.  This sound has a special safety significance.  This timely notice was explained by Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof when he volunteered, “It is time to walk your yard.”

Becauseof this year’s end-of-winter snows, the simple tour around the mowing areas can easily produce a surprising collection of items on the lawn. These forgotten and unknowns objects have accumulated between the last mowing between last year final mowing and now.  In explaining the importanceof this safety mandate, Chief Everlof stated, “Each of these objects can easily become a possible fatal or injurious missile when a mower passes over them.”

Even with the minimum possible damage, these flying objects can inflict serious injury, break windows, or dent siding or damage a parked car.  This ritual should not be only a once-a-yearpractice.  Looking before any mowing helps eliminate the possibility of yard items becoming dangerous to people,pets, and the property.  “Before mowing,please adopt this important and simple way of prevention,” urged NewtownTownship’s Fire Chief

 

Part-time Firefighter - EMT Positions Available

Thursday, 26 March 2015 21:27

The Newtown Square Fire Company No. 1 is actively hiring for the position of Firefighter - Emergency Medical Technician.

All interested individuals are requested to submit their resume and certificates for employment no later than April 15, 2015.

Applicants must possess the following certifications to be considered for employment with the Newtown Square Fire Company No.1:

Pennsylvania Firefighter I, Pro Board
Pennsylvania Firefighter II, Pro Board
Emergency Medical Technician (PA State) Basic Life Support (CPR for the Healthcare provider)
Emergency Vehicle Operators (EVOC) Course
Pump Operations I
Pump Operations II (recommended)
Aerial Operations
Hazard-Material Operations Level
NIMS 100, 200, 700, and 800
25 Years of Age
Child Abuse Act Clearance Certificate
Valid Pennsylvania Driver License

All Applicants are requested to send all resume and certificates to Chief @nsfc.org, or US mail to PO Box 453, Newtown Square, PA. 19073 Attention: Chief P. Douglas Everlof.

All resumes and certificates must be submitted by: 04/15/2015.
 

Much Appreciated Gift

Friday, 20 March 2015 16:31

Long gone is the opportunity of there being a White Christmas, but a recent, greatly appreciated event experienced by the Newtown Square Fire Company would have been appropriate at that holiday.  As the predicted snow began to fall at a fast and steady pace in that early March snow fall, the firefighters felt it was time to exercise a purchase plan.

Now knowing if that day’s snowfall were to be the final snow of the winter, the amount of the falling snow made that day’s decisions an easy choice.  Because of the large amount of the concrete leading from the fire station’s vehicle storage doors to the street, a hefty snow blower was needed.  Another ingredient in this decision was the removal of the large amount of slush deposited at the end of the concreate pad by passing vehicles on southbound North Newtown Street Road (PA 252).

In keeping with a Fire Company corporate policy of making local purchases whenever possible, Captain Mike Kenny visited Carl Niemeyer at the nearby Niemeyer Corporation.  Seeing the need and having a fitting snow blower available, Mr. Niemeyer surprised the Fire Company with the gift of this needed safety item.

When thanked for this community outreach, Niemeyer volunteered he was continuing a policy begun by his father.  The deceased senior Niemeyer believed through cooperation of this nature, Newtown Square has had a historical image of community based activities and support.  As the region was “celebrating” the first day of spring, the Newtown Square Fire Company was prepared to meet the challenge of this hoped-for final snow of the winter.

The massive snowfall falls of March were easily removed by Newtown Square Fire Company crews thanks to the snow-managing snow blower recently received as a gift from the Fire Company’s neighbor the Niemeyer Corporation. Newtown Square FireFoto

 

Avoid Dangers From Utilities

Friday, 06 March 2015 13:41

The collection of recent news reports, including police dash-board camera scenes of a home disappearing in a natural gas explosion have helped increase concerns about residential natural gas malfunctions.  Following suggestions by the Newtown Square Fire Company can help eliminate the fears associated with the warning aroma of rotten eggs inside a home.

At the slightest smell of the ingredient added to natural gas as a warning effort, there are strict, yet easy-to-follow instructions for safety. Taking a cell or cordless phone, GET OUT - STAY OUT - CALL OUT from a location that is as far from the building as possible.

Before leaving the structure, avoid the temptation to turn lights either on or off. Both wall switches and lamps are a proven source of the ignition of leaking natural gas within structures;

Using the phone take out of the building, immediately call 9 1 1 and fully cooperate with the call taker or other persons at the Delaware County Emergency Dispatch Center. When outdoors, avoid starting a vehicle either in a garage or near the building.

All utilities—gas, electric, and water—can be sleeping giants. When all is well, they are necessities. When there is a problem, this is when troubles occur.

Addressing these potential dangers, Chief Doug Everlof stressed, “If there are even small concerns about gas or electric dangers, never hesitate to call for help. . Avoid life-threatening events by safely leaving the area or possible dangers and call 9 1 1.”

 

Second Chance

Friday, 06 March 2015 13:34

When Newtown Square firefighters encounter a non-working Smoke Detector, they ask “When was the battery changed? The greatest concern is finding no battery in the battery compartment in these life-saving devices.

When asked why the battery was not changed with the change of clocks, the most common response is either, “I started to do it,” “I forgot” or “I was going to do it tomorrow.”

If the occupant had installed the newer, 10-year Smoke Detector, this problem would have been avoided.

Following the recent “change-of-time,” Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof has once again stressed, “It only takes a short time to help protect lives by installing a fresh battery in the Carbon Monoxide Monitors or Smoke Detectors. Please do this today. This reminder is the idea behind the Newtown Square Fire Company’s Second Chance Club.”

Motivated by these continuing and unfortunate observations, not everyone follows the simple “change-of-time” reminders. To help everyone forgetting to change these batteries, the Newtown Square Fire Company continues to stress its “Second Chance Club.”

“Please don’t take chance with the lives of your family,” volunteered Chief Everlof. He added, “While a simple job, please make it your number one project. These devices need a power source to provide these life-saving protections. Insert new batteries in each of the home’s Carbon Monoxide Monitors and older style Smoke Detectors. Please do it now!”

Without the protection of these inexpensive and valued safety watchdogs, there may be no SECOND CHANCE.

 

 

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Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2015 Calls
January: 50
February:
2014 Total 689
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

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Latest Biddle's Corner

Safety Tips For Home

Unlike adults the curious minds of children rarely “see” dangers in and around a home. The Newtown Square Fire Company stresses there are at least four ways to help adults modify a home for the safety of children. The simplest method is crawling on the floor. From this vantage, an adult can view the same world as seen by a child—seeing the temptations created by the curiosity children.

A second method is to watch what children do both in play and general activities. As a father of older children, Chief Doug Everlof remembers, “They are too young to know about the dangers in life.” Often demonstrated by their climbing, children love to explore. Their mountains can be as simple as an open oven door, an easily opened chest of drawers, or a chair that gives access to climbing to see a wanted item.

Newer stoves include methods to anchor them to a wall, preventing them from tipping over. Homeowners can create ways to anchor tippable furniture. Another safety suggestion is remove heavy objects like a television set from the top of a chest of drawers. A similar suggestion is a reminder to place heavy storable items in the lowest drawer.

Chief Everlof volunteered, “According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every two weeks a child dies in our country from furniture, appliances or TVs tipping over. Each of us can help prevent these tragedies and make our homes a safer place.

A third method may be the most difficult. With maturity, adults see life in different ways than children. Try to ‘look back’ and begin to see life as a child and by returning to the adult world, remove the dangers we as adults have neglected to eliminate.

The final step suggests looking for lists and articles addressing items that need to be changed or eliminated to keep the home safe. One hint is to follow a trend being used in an increasing of stores and public gatherings—adding safety covers to all child-accessible electric outlets.

 
Serious Accident and Challenging Temperatures

While there is a regional stress for an increase in fire prevention because of an escalation in dwelling fires, the Newtown Square Fire Company was spared the torture of fighting fires in the near-record setting low temperatures. However, on Friday morning, February 20, the Newtown Fire Company had an emergency that demonstrated their mastery of rescue and vehicle-extrication skills in torturing temperatures.

The accident scene, the 100 block of Bryn Mawr Avenue, between West Chester Pike and Brookside, prompted the response of the Newtown rescue personnel and the Fire Company Ladder. Because of the position and condition of the car that had sustained extensive damage as it hit a tree and the weather conditions of near record-setting low temperatures, a companion rescue was summoned from neighboring Broomall.

As the patient was being evaluated, rescue personnel began the safety steps of stabilizing the vehicle. This procedure assures there will be no movement of the vehicle, both while initiating the disassembly of portions of the vehicle and the removal of the driver. This stabilization assures there will be no additional injuries that may occur if the vehicle were to move. To access the driver, doors and a segment of the roof were removed.

Aided by the Riddle Hospital crew staffing the Newtown Township Ambulance, the injured driver was carefully removed and prepared for hospital transport.

Deputy Chief George Guyer praised the firefighters from Newtown Square and Broomall for their efficient and profession effort in weather where the temperature was approaching 10 degrees. The temperature was as similarly hampering as the mangled metal the entrapped the injured driver.