Team Effort Saves A Life

Sunday, 20 July 2014 16:48

The first Monday in July will forever provide an unforgettable memory for a Rafferty Subaru technician and the staff of the local sales and service firm.  The memorable events of that day began a bit after 10 a.m. when the tech was returning a repaired vehicle to a parking area.

When it was noticed the tech had not moved from inside the vehicle, this unusual behavior prompted an investigation. The employee’s unresponsiveness resulted in a collection of rapid activities. When Rafferty employee and part-time Morton policeman Scott McGrady and fellow employee Ed Murrin discovered the stricken repair technician, this duo followed the current CPR protocols by having someone call the Delaware County 9 1 1 Center.

Assured help was enroute, Broomall Fire Company firefighter Ed Murrin started the life-saving chest compressions.

Corporate family member Bob Rafferty and repair technician/Newtown Square firefighter Josh Potter joined this team effort. The son of the stricken technician, also a Rafferty employee rushed to the scene and he needed consoling as the CPR continued.

The call to the Delco 9 1 1 Center a spawned response of emergency crews, the Newtown Township EMS unit and, following Fire Company’s Cardiac Arrest response pattern,  the Newtown Square Fire Company Rescue.  Joining in this team effort was the on-street collection of police.  This latter group--comprised of Newtown Square Police Sargent Dan Dougherty and Patrolmen Joe Alonso, Bill Moore, John Newell, and David Wilding—arrived with the valued Automatic External Defibrillator (AED).

Aided by the CPR, the AED assured the trip from Rafferty car dealership to the Bryn Mawr Hospital would aid in saving the life of the firm’s stricken employee.

These events prompted another collection of events. One week after the near-fatal experience, Rafferty’s service technician returned to the dealership to assure his co-workers of his recovery. Later that day, Bob Rafferty and Ed Murrin visited the Newtown Square Fire Company corporate monthly meeting and shared with the local firefighters the combined gratitude of the firm and their employee for the efforts of the Newtown Square firefighters.

Later in the week, Broomall firefighter-Safety officer Ed Murrin was asked about where he first learned the then practiced CPR methods. He answered this skill was learned when he previously served as an Engineer, Lieutenant, and Captain with the Yeadon Fire Company prior to his family’s move to Broomall.

The recovering Rafferty employee demonstrates there is no substitute for team efforts. He owes his life to a collection of people “becoming involved.”

CAPTION: Bob Rafferty (left) and Ed Murrin visited the Newtown Square Fire Company’s monthly meeting to thank the firefighters for their help during the recent life-saving effort for a stricken repair tech. Newtown Square FireFoto

 

Fire Crews Combine To Battle Blaze

Thursday, 17 July 2014 22:40

A normally quiet residential Radnor Township neighborhood became the site of a collection of regional fire apparatus and crews at 4:15 p.m. on Wednesday, July 9.  The large, multiple story stone home located near the intersection of Biddulph Road and Wyndom Lane sustained extensive damage in sections of the home.  The structure—one of approximately 6200 square feet and located on an acre lot—has been termed a mansion by the electronic media.

Arriving Radnor Fire Company apparatus reported fire showing from the dwelling.  The amount of fire, the size and complexity of the structure, resulted in an active attempt at controlling the fire.  To aid in the battle at controlling this fire, a request for a second alarm was sounded at 4:45 p.m.  Included in this assisting dispatch was a request for the Newtown Square Fire Company Aerial Ladder.

This request resulted in fire apparatus and crews responding from the Main Line fire companies, as well as supporting equipment from additional fire crews from stations  north and south of these original responders.  The complexity of the fire also demanded the use of high volume water patterns in the battle to control any further advance of the blaze.

Providing specific information about this fire, Newtown Square Fire Company Lieutenant Eric Harper volunteered this fire demonstrated how a collection of trained firefighters from different organizations can function as a well-organized operation. One example of these cooperative activities was the transition from combined interior and exterior advance of the blaze.

As is the practice in process of determining the origin of fires, the preliminary investigation was begun during the fire.  One person from the residence was transported to the Crozer Chester Burn Center. During this initial investigation it was felt a vehicle owned by the homeowner caught fire.  One observation pointed to this fire, believed to have possibly fueled by spilled gasoline, then spread to the three-car garage and then into the two-story living area.

This investigation continues with contributions from Radnor Police and fire specialists.

 

Fire Crews Combine To Battle Blaze

Thursday, 17 July 2014 22:40

A normally quiet residential Radnor Township neighborhood became the site of a collection of regional fire apparatus and crews at 4:15 p.m. on Wednesday, July 9.  The large, multiple story stone home located near the intersection of Biddulph Road and Wyndom Lane sustained extensive damage in sections of the home.  The structure—one of approximately 6200 square feet and located on an acre lot—has been termed a mansion by the electronic media.

Arriving Radnor Fire Company apparatus reported fire showing from the dwelling.  The amount of fire, the size and complexity of the structure, resulted in an active attempt at controlling the fire.  To aid in the battle at controlling this fire, a request for a second alarm was sounded at 4:45 p.m.  Included in this assisting dispatch was a request for the Newtown Square Fire Company Aerial Ladder.

This request resulted in fire apparatus and crews responding from the Main Line fire companies, as well as supporting equipment from additional fire crews from stations  north and south of these original responders.  The complexity of the fire also demanded the use of high volume water patterns in the battle to control any further advance of the blaze.

Providing specific information about this fire, Newtown Square Fire Company Lieutenant Eric Harper volunteered this fire demonstrated how a collection of trained firefighters from different organizations can function as a well-organized operation. One example of these cooperative activities was the transition from combined interior and exterior advance of the blaze.

As is the practice in process of determining the origin of fires, the preliminary investigation was begun during the fire.  One person from the residence was transported to the Crozer Chester Burn Center. During this initial investigation it was felt a vehicle owned by the homeowner caught fire.  One observation pointed to this fire, believed to have possibly fueled by spilled gasoline, then spread to the three-car garage and then into the two-story living area.

This investigation continues with contributions from Radnor Police and fire specialists.

 

In An Emergency, Follow The Rules

Thursday, 17 July 2014 22:36

Recently, area firefighters were welcoming the news of lives being saved by a residential Smoke Detector in Pennsylvania home. Hearing this news as it was being shared by the media, Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof commented, “Good news has finally become news.”

This good news was sadly replaced by a Philadelphia fire in a collection of row homes that that resulted in the loss of four young lives and forced eight families from their residences. While there were strong emotions from the neighborhood, the investigation centered on these deaths and the fire continues.

Documentation demonstrated the response of fire apparatus was timely. What is being unearthed is there appears to have been a delay in the first call to Philadelphia’s 9 1 1 Dispatch Center. The good intention of trying to extinguish a fire far too large for non-skilled efforts gave this small, initial fire an almost explosive head start.

A simple guideline from Chief Everlof can prove to be a life- and property saving suggestion. He shared, “The first step in any suspected emergency must be a call to 9 1 1. If a person collapsed or is found unconscious, make the call for help first, then initiate CPR, if needed. If there is either a threat of a fire, or an actual blaze, first call for help via 9 1 1. Then, if safe try to extinguish the fire. Never endanger yourself in trying to put out a fire.”

A simple rule that follows Chief Everlof’s meaningful suggestion is the following, “Always call for help before trying to provide help. Remember 9 1 1 is your best friend. Unless you are totally sure a call to 9 1 1 has been made, your call may prove to either be the first call or a call with additional, meaningful details.

 

In An Emergency, Follow The Rules

Thursday, 17 July 2014 22:36

Recently, area firefighters were welcoming the news of lives being saved by a residential Smoke Detector in Pennsylvania home. Hearing this news as it was being shared by the media, Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof commented, “Good news has finally become news.”

This good news was sadly replaced by a Philadelphia fire in a collection of row homes that that resulted in the loss of four young lives and forced eight families from their residences. While there were strong emotions from the neighborhood, the investigation centered on these deaths and the fire continues.

Documentation demonstrated the response of fire apparatus was timely. What is being unearthed is there appears to have been a delay in the first call to Philadelphia’s 9 1 1 Dispatch Center. The good intention of trying to extinguish a fire far too large for non-skilled efforts gave this small, initial fire an almost explosive head start.

A simple guideline from Chief Everlof can prove to be a life- and property saving suggestion. He shared, “The first step in any suspected emergency must be a call to 9 1 1. If a person collapsed or is found unconscious, make the call for help first, then initiate CPR, if needed. If there is either a threat of a fire, or an actual blaze, first call for help via 9 1 1. Then, if safe try to extinguish the fire. Never endanger yourself in trying to put out a fire.”

A simple rule that follows Chief Everlof’s meaningful suggestion is the following, “Always call for help before trying to provide help. Remember 9 1 1 is your best friend. Unless you are totally sure a call to 9 1 1 has been made, your call may prove to either be the first call or a call with additional, meaningful details.

 

Letter to the Editior: Fund Drive Solicitation

Wednesday, 02 July 2014 09:19

Editor:

Following a recent Sunday worship service I was asked about the validity of a request for funds from an out-of-the-area telephone-based organization that was claiming to be collecting funds for “your local fire department.”  This well-meaning personal query has once more generated serious concerns within the staff of the Newtown Square Fire Company.

Telephone solicitation has never been a form of funding used by the local volunteers-unpaid professionals during their nearly century of service. The total funding of the Fire Company is provided by people we protect.  In simple terms, the anemic public and commercial/ professional response to the Newtown Square Fire Company’s current funding drive is generating serious concerns this year.

It appears from dialogue with newer Newtown Township residents they do not understand that the staff for their firefighting and rescue services train and serve as volunteers.  Volunteerism should not be seen as a “second-class” operation.

This form of dedicated community protection and other forms of volunteer is totally misunderstood in other parts of the world. These cultures can’t understand why tax funding and total salaried fire protection is not the standard.  With the anemic response to the 2014 Fund Drive, are there similar thoughts here in Newtown Square?

Just as residents in this historic community within William Penn’s New World dream must maintain their “home,” so must the Newtown Square Fire Company.  This organization’s aging structure houses a collection of very necessary life- and property saving apparatus.

There are similarities between individual’s vehicles and the Fire Company’s specialized vehicles.  Yours and ours are both well-served by preventive maintenance and repairs. Eventually, replacement.  When replacement costs are compared, the prices of firefighting apparatus are far greater.  Fire Apparatus have greater responsibilities, demands, functions, and complexities; these demands mean greater costs.

All of the requirements of your fire protection require funds. These funds only come from the annual funding appeals. The insufficient 2014 Fund Drive response endangers the life of the physical assets of the Newtown Square Fire Company. Also at risk is the training and education that guarantees professionalism. This professional identity is the foundation of the protection provided by the near-century community protection.

For our neighbors who have forgotten to fund the Newtown Square Fire Company your generous donation can be sent to the Fire Company’s processing area at PO Box 333 c/o Bryn Mawr Trust Bryn Mawr PA 19010.

Your support is needed to assure the protection of lives and property;

Yours in service,

L James Biddle, CLU

Serving since 1986

 

 

Work With Safety

Friday, 27 June 2014 10:35

It is not uncommon to add some house cleaning to the early summer activities.  Newtown Square Fire Company Chief Doug Everlof has shared some safety suggestions for these warm-weather projects. He stated, “Regardless of how urgent this seasonal cleaning process is thought to be, never neglect even the simplest of safety tips.”

Chief Everlof’s first safety reminder stated, “Always read the label on all cleaning supplies. Use the designed amount of the item and never mix more than one product.” Avoiding either of these guidelines can easily result in a dangerous event.

Newtown’s Fire Chief also offered an often forgotten safety reminder, “Always work with proper ventilation and protective items. These requirements are an often-overlooked health and fire safety necessities.”

Include appropriate planning before starting any household activities. Proper preparations and proper disposal of unwanted products or other items are key ingredient in safety. Before undertaking many projects, remember the wearing of eye protection devices is important. Even the smallest of particles can produce an injury and pain to the eyes.

Following two commonly cited Newtown Square safety warnings: (1) always read the full and (2) follow the printed instructions. Any other way is a form of taking shortcuts.”

Concluding this simple list of safety suggestions, Chief Everlof stressed, “As a substitute to ‘elbow grease,’ man’s inventive mind has created a collection of cleaning agents. Avid taking shortcuts by using the designated amount of a product and never mix multiple cleaning products. This attempt at trying to ‘hurry along’ any cleaning tasks” is extremely dangerous.

The Newtown Square Fire Company continues to stress that every household project must include safety. This advice applies outdoors, in the home, at work, and any recreation.

 

 

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Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2013 Calls
January: 61
February: 43
March: 48
April: 44
May: 66
June: 55
July: 61
August: 55
September: 50
October: 52
November: 60
December: 77
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

Upcoming Events

08-11-2014 19:30 - 21:30
Company Meeting

09-02-2014 19:30 - 21:30
Auxiliary Meeting

09-08-2014 19:30 - 21:30
Company Meeting

10-07-2014 19:30 - 21:30
Auxiliary Meeting

10-13-2014 19:30 - 21:30
Company Meeting

Latest Biddle's Corner

In An Emergency, Follow The Rules

Recently, area firefighters were welcoming the news of lives being saved by a residential Smoke Detector in Pennsylvania home. Hearing this news as it was being shared by the media, Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof commented, “Good news has finally become news.”

This good news was sadly replaced by a Philadelphia fire in a collection of row homes that that resulted in the loss of four young lives and forced eight families from their residences. While there were strong emotions from the neighborhood, the investigation centered on these deaths and the fire continues.

Documentation demonstrated the response of fire apparatus was timely. What is being unearthed is there appears to have been a delay in the first call to Philadelphia’s 9 1 1 Dispatch Center. The good intention of trying to extinguish a fire far too large for non-skilled efforts gave this small, initial fire an almost explosive head start.

A simple guideline from Chief Everlof can prove to be a life- and property saving suggestion. He shared, “The first step in any suspected emergency must be a call to 9 1 1. If a person collapsed or is found unconscious, make the call for help first, then initiate CPR, if needed. If there is either a threat of a fire, or an actual blaze, first call for help via 9 1 1. Then, if safe try to extinguish the fire. Never endanger yourself in trying to put out a fire.”

A simple rule that follows Chief Everlof’s meaningful suggestion is the following, “Always call for help before trying to provide help. Remember 9 1 1 is your best friend. Unless you are totally sure a call to 9 1 1 has been made, your call may prove to either be the first call or a call with additional, meaningful details.

 
In An Emergency, Follow The Rules

Recently, area firefighters were welcoming the news of lives being saved by a residential Smoke Detector in Pennsylvania home. Hearing this news as it was being shared by the media, Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof commented, “Good news has finally become news.”

This good news was sadly replaced by a Philadelphia fire in a collection of row homes that that resulted in the loss of four young lives and forced eight families from their residences. While there were strong emotions from the neighborhood, the investigation centered on these deaths and the fire continues.

Documentation demonstrated the response of fire apparatus was timely. What is being unearthed is there appears to have been a delay in the first call to Philadelphia’s 9 1 1 Dispatch Center. The good intention of trying to extinguish a fire far too large for non-skilled efforts gave this small, initial fire an almost explosive head start.

A simple guideline from Chief Everlof can prove to be a life- and property saving suggestion. He shared, “The first step in any suspected emergency must be a call to 9 1 1. If a person collapsed or is found unconscious, make the call for help first, then initiate CPR, if needed. If there is either a threat of a fire, or an actual blaze, first call for help via 9 1 1. Then, if safe try to extinguish the fire. Never endanger yourself in trying to put out a fire.”

A simple rule that follows Chief Everlof’s meaningful suggestion is the following, “Always call for help before trying to provide help. Remember 9 1 1 is your best friend. Unless you are totally sure a call to 9 1 1 has been made, your call may prove to either be the first call or a call with additional, meaningful details.