Back to School Safety

Friday, 26 August 2016 15:16

It is that time of the year. As sunsets come earlier and the end of August is approaching, returning to school becomes a family activity.  The Newtown Square Fire Company reminds both drivers and children, this time of the year ushers in renewed safety practices. Chief Doug Everlof stressed, “Going back to school is a serious change for drivers, as well as for our community’s youth.

When school returns to being a part of their daily activities, it is not uncommon for children to take advantage of the diminishing daylight and continuing warmer temperatures to enjoy outdoor activities. It is also common for these playful student to forget the family’s lessons in their role of being safe

The size of car in comparison to the size of children adds the requirement for drivers to remember they have a renewed driving-safely responsibility.  To compensate for a back to school students’ forgetfulness of safety, it becomes the responsibility of drivers to increase their awareness of the possibility of having to share the roadway with these forgetful students.

School zones are identified by standardized signage.  To assure driver attention, during the beginning and ending of the school day, electronic speed control reminder adds to driver reminders. In community recreational areas., There normally are no standardized warnings reminding drivers they are approaching a neighborhood play areas.

This void has prompted the Newtown Square Fire Company to volunteer an additional reminder for drivers:  become more alert and to drive more slowly when children are seen playing. Bending the rules of proper spelling, the Newtown Square Fire Company has made a suggestion for all drivers, "Please remember to give our children a brake!"

A common signage found near many schools and recreation areas becomes yet another warning, "We have many children but we have none to spare."  Another thought shared by a Newtown Square firefighter also provides a meaningful safety message, “Please drive as if the playing children were your own.

 

Stayin' Alive

Friday, 26 August 2016 15:14

The song, “Stayin’ Alive” featured by the Bee Gees in their album, A Tribute to the Brothers Gibb, has multiple values in life-saving.  Both staying alive applications have proven successes—keeping people alive.  One application of this1977 song is the currently accepted cadence in the life-saving use of CPR.

The second application of “Stayin’ Alive” is a concept that is regaining the attention of the Newtown Square Fire Company and American safety representatives.  Both groups are once more urging occupant of vehicles to use the life-saving, combined lap belt and shoulder restraints.

Research has shown the initial successes in driver and front seat use of these mandated safety devices have largely been maintained. Research has also shown the front seat safety successes are not currently shared in the remainder of the seating areas.

The Newtown Square Fire Company, joins with the national safety experts in an endorsement of an ongoing driver safety program for drivers and an increased emphasis for all passengers to consistently use these safety constraints in a vehicle seating areas.

One of the most often quoted and uttered safety slogans is, “Buckle up for safety.”. Newtown Square Fire company strongly urges everyone in a vehicle everyone to follow this safety suggestion.

More and more statistics are pointing to the fact that people that are passengers in the rear of the car feel that they are immune from the benefits of wearing a seatbelt. Yet increased statistic show that these rear seat passengers become injured because when the car abruptly stops unrestrained rear seat occupants become human projectiles.

Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof volunteered, “Not only do the unbelted, reseat passengers become injured, they also inflict injury is on individuals in the front seat of cars.”  This statement was validated by the research that has shown an unbuckled individual in the rear seating of a car are statistically shown do have three times the number of injuries as than those who are buckled into the seatbelt in the car.

Observation by safety experts in law-enforcement personnel show that between one fourth and one third of the young people and adults in the non-front seats of cars do not buckle up for safety.   Far too many people feel that "just because it's a short trip to the store" they feel they are immune from being hurt in a car accident.

Chief Everlof added another set of statistics.   continue to show that far too many of the fatal accident happened within 25 miles of home and it's less than interstate highway speeds.

Drivers are reminded that no vehicle should not move until the sound of the safety click a seatbelt is heard from the front seat and second and third rows if vehicle has them. Buckle up for safety applies to every passenger and the driver within any vehicle within all vehicles.

The simple click of a seatbelt becomes a contribution to safety—the most welcomed sound a responsible driver will ever hear.

 

Home Safety: Fire Extinguishers

Tuesday, 23 August 2016 14:06

With hopes of extended periods of cooler temperatures, family schedules will drift indoors. As the Newtown Square Fire Company begins its preparations for this year’s Fire Prevention program, Lieutenant Bill Rankin suggested this is a good time to become familiar with the simple steps of using a fire extinguisher.

All fires start small, all small fires can quickly grow to be dangerous, big fires. If there is no immediate danger to yourself and others, an available fire extinguisher, when properly used, can extinguish small fires. “Never put yourself at risk. One way to be safe is the familiarity with how a fire extinguisher should be used, “stressed the Fire Company’s Lieutenant Rankin.

In describing the proper use of a fire extinguisher the Newtown Square firefighters suggest remembering a simple, single word—PASS. These four letters become the reminder of how to simply extinguish fires using a fire extinguisher.

PASS:

Pull the safety pin.

Aim at the bottom of the fire.

Squeeze the handle of the fire extinguisher.

Sweep from side to side beginning at the base.

Don’t be stingy in applying the extinguishing agent. By doing this, there should be no need to reapply the work done a “first application. The extinguishing “blanket” should not be disturbed.

In the kitchen, fire extinguisher should be visibly stored near the entry; avoid storage in a cabinet near the cooking area. Newtown Square’s Rankin volunteered, “The simplest way to extinguish afire in a stove top cooking utensil is to use another, larger cooking utensil or a non-combustible utensil lid. “

Calmly approaching the burning contents in a stove-top burner area, use the lid or larger utensil to smother the flames. Apply this larger vessel being used in a hinging action, with the imaginary hinge being at the closest burning area.

Slowly lower this smothering, larger item over the fire.

Lieutenant Rankin promptly added, “The next step is patience. Avoid the temptation to see if the fire is extinguished. Wait until both stovetop vessel and the smothering “cover” are cool to the touch to “lift the extinguish item.” The slowest method of extinguishing is the removal of a fire’s source of air.

Completing this simple primer, the Fire Company urges resident to avoid trying to extinguish burning liquids with water. The combustible liquid will float on the water, expanding the area of flames and the fire danger.

Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof adds the greatest tools in home fire safety is understanding the importance of ‘knowing what to do’ and keeping calm. Headed, “By mentally practicing these home-safety suggestions cannot be over-emphasized.”

Common types of fire extinguishers

 

  • Class A: Common combustibles (wood, paper, cloth, etc.) common in a typical home or commercial settings.
  • Class B: Flammable liquids and gases (Gasoline, propane and solvents) often spread rapidly and can even re-flash after the flames are extinguished.
  • Class C: Live electrical equipment (computers, fax machines, etc.) - can be caused by a spark, power surge or short circuit.
  • Class D: Combustible metals (magnesium, lithium, titanium, etc.) - fires involve combustible metals such as magnesium and sodium., require special dry powder agents.
  • Class K: Cooking media (cooking oils and fats) these extremely hot fires that have the ability to re-flash.

 

 

Home To College Items

Thursday, 11 August 2016 09:59

Some college students are preparing to leave home for the first extended period of time.  These students may need some guidance or help in selecting items to take to school. Other students are returning as veterans and hopefully they remember what they will need. A collection of Newtown Square firefighter remembers their “first time” away from home.  Their memories have contributed to a ‘take to school list.

The number one item of this list continues to be a thermometer.  “What type” is a common response to this suggestion.  Then, as now, the answer states, “Duplicate the type used at home. This will help remove some of the stress of being away from home.”

Other items included in this “off to school” list of simple health items going off to school may include antihistamines, decongestants, cough medicine, and throat lozenges. A small collection of the salt packets used at fast food restaurants and a glass of warm water can combine to help irritated, sore throats.

As a surprise to the student, send along a surprise selection of soothing herbal teas. They can be helpful for colds or the stresses of school.

This list of items should include pain relievers for overexertion, headaches, or menstrual cramps. These may save the student a trip to the “never-nearby” pharmacy.

For scrapes and cuts, the former, local emergency medical crews suggest alcohol for surface cleaning wounds and then hydrogen peroxide or antibiotic creams for preventing infections.  The packed ‘cure’ items should also include a collection of adhesive bandages.

‘A college environment sometimes transforms the times set aside for eating into almost anytime, anywhere, or anything.  A long-proven help for dietary problems are antacids in liquid, tablet, or chewable forms. The Newtown Square fire fighters stress, “Experience has demonstrated that whatever works at home should work equally well when away from home.”

Until needed, there may seem little reason to pack a pair of tweezers. Despite any reluctance to do so, tweezers may prove to be invaluable for removing splinters, insect stingers, or deer ticks.  Also include an anti-itch lotion.  This soothing item can create welcomed comfort for bites, poison ivy, or rashes.

important reminder included in this elementary list of ‘leaving home’ items includes the simple, important tools of communications. One segment of this stressed communications is the dialogue between parents and students.   Asking for parental help or guidance is both quick and accurate.

Another important communication, one with and early priority when arriving on campus is the investing of a few moments to locate the school’s Health Center. It is best to providing them with health records and any special medical concerns, a list of all prescribed medicines, and over-the-counter medicines before any possible illness or emergency occurs. As a special reminder, the firefighter-EMS providers add, “Don’t forget to list any allergies that your student may have.”

In concluding this partial list of school-health suggestions, the Newtown Square Fire Company’s firefighters have added, Hopefully, the home-borne habit of hand washing also goes off to school with the student.  Leaving home and living in a school environment can create many differing challenges.  By being prepared for illness and accidents is one way to help limit any away-from-home problems. Taking a little bit of home to school is always a good help in both cures and prevention.

 

Dangers Of The Late Summer Sun

Thursday, 11 August 2016 09:15

While merchants are beginning their Back to School promotions, there is sufficient summer remaining for those sun-lovers who have not previously to find enough “sun-time.” The Newtown Square Fire Company, staffed by many members having Emergency Medical training, reminds residents there are dangers from an over-exposure to solar radiation.

Deputy Fire Chief George Guyer IV, both a paramedic and a Registered Nurse, volunteered, “We all know someone who has experienced the problems of skin damage from the over-exposure to the sun. Like others sharing in this preventable problem, they apparently did not heed the seasonally shared warnings about sunburn-related cancers.

Newtown Square Fire Company’s second in command acknowledges it is impossible to spend the summer living within a cocoon. The alternative, preventative steps include exposure restrictions—length of sun exposure and times of the day—and the proper use of the appropriate protective sunscreen material.

Sunscreen materials with a high SPF and a proper application and replenishment of all sunburn prevention materials combine to become helpers in the protection and cancer-prevention process. Guyer advised, “Some people try to ‘spread’ their sunscreen too thinly. If less than the recommended amount is used, what may have been a high protection label number, such as an SPS 50 or greater product, is not achieving the desired level of protection. When applied too sparingly, the actual safety could be as little as a single digit amount of protection.”

Another recently publicized product is the waterproof sunscreen products. The only guarantee for totally, prolonged protection is to reapply sunscreen when leaving the water or when perspiring. “Again, please don’t be stingy,” advises the Newtown Square Fire Company’s Deputy Chief.

Following a reoccurring reminder shared by the local volunteer firefighters, “…read the label” is another step in sunburn-fostered cancers. Look for the documentation that states a sunscreen product is effective for both UVA and UVB radiation reduction.

There are two areas that are often neglected in the sun-protection process. Both the lips and the eyes need safety protection. These areas of the body are often not included in the steps used provide protection from the adverse effects of solar radiation.

A wet garment is not a guarantee of the desired protection. Only recently there has been the development of light weight outer clothing that provides the blocking of the unwanted rays. Look for this type of garment.

While the body needs vitamin D, there must also be a dose of safety when obtaining this vitamin from the sun. While the sun is an available source of this vitamin, this solar source also produces forms of radiation that are identified with cancer.

This is the time of the year when some summer-lovers often gain their tans by moving to tanning booths. This source of radiation continues to considered as a yet another source of radiation-supplied tan.  being viewed as a dangerous alternative to spray or cream-based skin color changes that resemble a tan.

Correct use of the properly rated sunscreens, avoiding the high radiation times of the day, and heeding the smart, common sense warnings all go a long way in the prevention of sun-related cancers. The tanned skin of today can easily turn into a severe, future, possibly life-threatening problem. Heed and read the labels and also include a dose of common sense when out in the sun.” Again, follow the Newtown Square Fire Company’s safety reminder and ‘read the label’ along with faithfully following the instructions.

 

Community Cooperation

Friday, 05 August 2016 18:08

The Newtown Square Fire Company’s specially designed piece of support apparatus of the recently demonstrated the flexibility of the volunteer organization’s Traffic Unit.  This service-designed apparatus responded to a non-fire dispatch on Thursday, August 4, 2016.
Earlier, following the area being ravaged by recent rains and winds, a Boot Road tree sustained serious damage along with nearby utility wires. Segments of the of the damaged tree and an entanglement with utility lines were responsible for the removal of the damaged tree.  To accomplish this removal task, the crews from both the Asplundh Company and the Township’s Public Works required protection from vehicular traffic.
While Boot Road is not a major highway, it nevertheless has become a popular connecting short cut between Goshen Road and West Chester Pile.  The selected pieces of traffic control devices and the attending Newtown Square Fire Company personnel successfully assured the protection of the workers and a timely and professional clearing of the damages and dangers.
The increased numbers of both structural fires, along with increases in roadway emergencies and fires, have added to types and numbers of the necessary traffic control tools.  These unique tools helped spawned this current generation of this special service vehicle.
Led by Captain Carl Ewing and aided by fellow officers Fire Police Lieutenant Roland Buccialia and Sergeant Nate Glazer, the enclosed 2010 Ford often initiates its traffic warnings through the vision of the elevated, electric changeable direction arrow.  Enclosed in vehicle are pullout drawers housing rows of vertically stored specially designed traffic cones; each cone was capable of holding and displaying a direction arrow. Also were stored collapsible sets of informational signs. Included in the impressive collection of special traffic control tools as well as an onboard generator and a small, portable–hand truck carried electric generator.
The cooperative responses by the officers and members of the Newtown Square Fire Police element within the century old emergency service providers is well known for its combined community services and outreach to other fire organizations interested in the concepts of fire police services.
 

Seasonal Shore Safety

Monday, 01 August 2016 06:48

When the weather permits, a common recreational area are the Atlantic Ocean beaches of New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland. One common risk mentioned during leisure television features—Rip Currents.  This dangerous ocean condition is the product of several simultaneous conditions. The shape of the shoreline and the source direction of the ocean’s wave actions.

In commenting on the dangers of a Rip Current, Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof stressed, “Rather than studying the cause of Rip Currents, it is safer to heed the warnings, enjoy the relaxation and wait for the safety advice to return to the water.  If there are any doubts about water safety, seek advice from the beach safety personnel.”

Experienced beach personnel are trained in rescue skills and they are well-informed of the ocean’s conditions.  Another danger, one of often erroneously confused with a Rip current is the ocean’s “undertow.” An undertow is a dangerous ocean threat that is described as a current of water that can pull even sizable adults down to the ocean’s bottom.

Instead of ignoring informational broadcast warnings and public service announcements, listen to their content. Citing the wisdom of this suggestion, Chief Everlof added, “This simple instruction becomes a way to prevent injuries and saving a lives.”

 

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Run Statistics

2015 Calls
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February:
2014 Total 689
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2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
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Latest Biddle's Corner

Community Cooperation
The Newtown Square Fire Company’s specially designed piece of support apparatus of the recently demonstrated the flexibility of the volunteer organization’s Traffic Unit.  This service-designed apparatus responded to a non-fire dispatch on Thursday, August 4, 2016.
Earlier, following the area being ravaged by recent rains and winds, a Boot Road tree sustained serious damage along with nearby utility wires. Segments of the of the damaged tree and an entanglement with utility lines were responsible for the removal of the damaged tree.  To accomplish this removal task, the crews from both the Asplundh Company and the Township’s Public Works required protection from vehicular traffic.
While Boot Road is not a major highway, it nevertheless has become a popular connecting short cut between Goshen Road and West Chester Pile.  The selected pieces of traffic control devices and the attending Newtown Square Fire Company personnel successfully assured the protection of the workers and a timely and professional clearing of the damages and dangers.
The increased numbers of both structural fires, along with increases in roadway emergencies and fires, have added to types and numbers of the necessary traffic control tools.  These unique tools helped spawned this current generation of this special service vehicle.
Led by Captain Carl Ewing and aided by fellow officers Fire Police Lieutenant Roland Buccialia and Sergeant Nate Glazer, the enclosed 2010 Ford often initiates its traffic warnings through the vision of the elevated, electric changeable direction arrow.  Enclosed in vehicle are pullout drawers housing rows of vertically stored specially designed traffic cones; each cone was capable of holding and displaying a direction arrow. Also were stored collapsible sets of informational signs. Included in the impressive collection of special traffic control tools as well as an onboard generator and a small, portable–hand truck carried electric generator.
The cooperative responses by the officers and members of the Newtown Square Fire Police element within the century old emergency service providers is well known for its combined community services and outreach to other fire organizations interested in the concepts of fire police services.
 
Keeping Safe In The Summer

Summer, for many is a time for life changes.  One characteristic that must remain constant is the ongoing practices or safety.  While adults and children are finding ways to enjoy the avenues of fun and relaxation, the common-sense habits that keep the neighbors of the Newtown Square Fire Company safe must not be relaxed.

While often associated with relaxation, there are serious danger from the ongoing exposures to the sun.  Regardless how a bad sunburn occurred, the often ignored skin condition can be responsible for current and future skin dangers. There are simple and proven steps to prevent this damage to the skin.  Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof added, “Be aware of the necessity of reapplication after the initial use and after swimming or heavy perspiration.”  Also, the dangers of skin cancer can also be lessened by the wearing of long-sleeved clothing and of the use of face- and head-protecting, wide-brimmed hats.

Overexertion from both work and fun are influenced the effects or high temperature and the dreaded humidity. The joys of fun and the necessity of accomplishing a task can easily ignore the dangers of thirst.  Often the use of fluids other than water and proven hydrating liquids are selected to combat thirst and the other signs of dehydration.  Alcoholic drinks, coffee, tea and caffeine drinks do not help in reversing the dangers of dehydration. Also be aware of the signs of the telltale thirst and feeling weak, dizzy, or fatigue.

One of the seasonal practices is outdoor eating. Chief Everlof volunteered. “In a quest to “refuel” after work and play avoid the temptation to find immediate satisfaction avoid eating a pink-in-the-middle hamburger; a precook hotdog is a wiser choice to help satisfy hunger and avoid food poisoning. If a food is meant to be cooled, avoid eating any chilled food where there is any doubt about that foods continual, proper safe temperature storage

The happiness of outdoor recreation fun must not responsible for injuries and possible fatalities.  Be wise in the water and don’t relax the safety practices of biking at all times with the safety of a helmet.  Weather in a boat or swimming in pools, rivers, or the ocean, never relax the practices of safety. Just like water safety, all out activities must be supported by the proven guideline of “being aware of your surroundings.”

Both at home or in other locales, there are dangers “from the bugs.”  Mosquitoes inflict pain and discomfort.  While in certain, select areas, a local mosquito inflicts other than pain.  By following the sensible use of preventive measures current and future protection must be used to help assure immediate and long-term safety.

Chief Everlof stressed a simple, yet effective summation, “By making safety a common practice, the summer activities need not be altered.  The addition of prevention does not eliminate the happiness of summer fun.  Instead, when these basic suggestions are followed they assure a vacation remains a happy and safe summer.”