St. Annie's

Saturday, 16 May 2015 10:16

As the Monday evening, May 11, evening rush hour traffic in Newtown Square was beginning to diminish, a multiple community fire service dispatch produced a temporary increase.  This fire call began with a Newtown Square Company response to an automatic fire alarm alert coming from the spacious St. Anastasia School on West Chester Pike school complex.

First arriving Assistant Chief Joe Certo was aided in his search for the cause of this alarm by information provided by the school’s alarm system.  Upon entering the reported area—the basement area of the school’s Kindergarten Center—he verified there was smoke.

Prompted by the size of the lower level of the school, Certo asked the Delaware County Fire Dispatch Center to add the remainder of the pre-established emergency responders.  This included fire units, Rapid Intervention, Fire Police, and EMS units and personnel from Broomall, Radnor, Edgmont, Upper Providence Township’s Rose Tree and Haverford Township's Bon Air fire companies.

With the quick determination of the source of the odor, all but a single piece of fire apparatus from Newtown and Broomall were returned.

At the end of the work week, a similar noontime fire dispatch on Friday, May 15 summoned Newtown Square fire apparatus and support fire apparatus and crews for rapid intervention fire police, and  the Newtown Square EMS apparatus.  Upon arrival and inspection, the local firefighters returned all but Newtown’s aerial ladder and the fire police vehicle.

In addition to the local firefighters, the response patterns for potentially high occupancy structures include supplementary apparatus and crews.

A responding Newtown Square firefighter praised the accuracy of the nature of the report provided by the caller from the Newtown Square Presbyterian Church when he observed, “ It was on target when it was described as having an electrical smell. Also, the caller provided an accurate possible location of the odor. By keeping calm and being so accurate this appreciated source aided in a quick fire company evaluation and aided in returning all additional emergency apparatus.”

The local firefighters also observed the conscience of the two fires of a similar nature as bookends in a single work week is very unusual.  Another similarity was the cooperative nature of the staff of the two churches.


Newtown Square Fire Company’s aerial is seen being elevated to the roof of the building. This is done to quickly evaluate any smoke making its way unseen to the roof of the structure.  Newtown Square Fire Foto

 

Dryer Dangers Often Forgotten

Tuesday, 12 May 2015 12:52

An often forgotten safety concept is one that involves the simple undertaking of walking around the home and yard.  Many people often find comfort in the idiom of “Out of sight  Out of mind.”  Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof sees possible dangers in this almost ancient saying.

Throughout the average home there are multiple areas that can harbor dangers.   Many of these dangers can be a source of an unsuspected fire.  For many busy residents, time is a dwindling part of their lives.  It is not uncommon to “throw a load of wash into the dryer” and then leave home to run an errand or dash off to meeting.

Chief Everlof commented, “This practice is seen as a form of household efficiency.  This time-saving act can also become the source of a fire if there has not been a recent inspection of the dryer’s exhaust.”   The buildup of lint accompanied by the heat needed to dry wet laundry is found to be the source of many home fires.

The Newtown Square Fire Company  provided a partial list of signs that a dryer needs a safety inspection and cleaning in a recent press release:

  • Clothing does not dry completely after a normal drying cycle.
  • A musty odor is noticed in the clothing following the drying cycle
  • Clothing seems unusually hot to the touch after a complete drying cycle.
  • The dryer vent hood flap does not properly open as it is designed to do during the operation of the dryer.
  • Debris is noticed within the outside dryer vent opening.

The following observations are additional indications of the need for a safety inspection and cleaning. These were not included in the press release:

  • Drying time for clothing takes longer than 35 to 40 minutes in duration.
  • The dryer vent hood flap does not properly open as it is designed to do during the operation of the dryer..
  • Excessive heat is noticed within the room in which the dryer is being operated.
  • Large amounts of lint accumulate in the lint trap for the dryer during operation.
  • A visible sign of lint and debris is noticed around the lint filter for the dryer.
  • Excessive odor is noticed from dryer sheets that are used during the drying cycle.

Newtown Square’s Chief Everlof added not all dryer placements within a home are created equally.  In older homes the common location of a dryer is next to an outside wall.  This is in contrast to dryer locations in some newer homes where this household appliance may be elsewhere in the home.  The fire chief added, “This means the vent exhaust pipe can have a long run to the exterior of the home. This distance often means a bigger collection of possibly combustible lint and debris and a greater susceptibility to fire. “

Regardless of the length, any distance and a lack of periodic cleaning can combine to be the source of a fire. The Newtown Square Fire Company warns in this potential problem, ‘Out of sight’ should never become ‘Out of the minds’ of safety-conscious people.

 

Smoker Danger

Tuesday, 12 May 2015 12:48

Chief Doug Everlof has asked that smokers please practice their own fire prevention campaign by paying attention to where and how they discard cigarettes. A common landscaping mulch consists of colored wood chips.

Normal rainfall aid in preventing fires from discarded cigarettes, but this natural fire prevention help can be partially eliminated by long spells of rain-free weather. The thoughtful and proper discarding of individual “spent” cigarettes will help eliminate this documented danger.

Chief Everlof volunteered, "Fire prevention is everyone’s responsibility.  Please change smoking habits.   Don’t just throw a cigarette butt out a window or drop it to the ground. The unseen burning of a cigarette can start a threatening fire. Fire prevention is easy if it is practiced.”

 

Safety Tips For Home

Friday, 03 April 2015 15:20

Unlike adults the curious minds of children rarely “see” dangers in and around a home. The Newtown Square Fire Company stresses there are at least four ways to help adults modify a home for the safety of children. The simplest method is crawling on the floor. From this vantage, an adult can view the same world as seen by a child—seeing the temptations created by the curiosity children.

A second method is to watch what children do both in play and general activities. As a father of older children, Chief Doug Everlof remembers, “They are too young to know about the dangers in life.” Often demonstrated by their climbing, children love to explore. Their mountains can be as simple as an open oven door, an easily opened chest of drawers, or a chair that gives access to climbing to see a wanted item.

Newer stoves include methods to anchor them to a wall, preventing them from tipping over. Homeowners can create ways to anchor tippable furniture. Another safety suggestion is remove heavy objects like a television set from the top of a chest of drawers. A similar suggestion is a reminder to place heavy storable items in the lowest drawer.

Chief Everlof volunteered, “According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every two weeks a child dies in our country from furniture, appliances or TVs tipping over. Each of us can help prevent these tragedies and make our homes a safer place.

A third method may be the most difficult. With maturity, adults see life in different ways than children. Try to ‘look back’ and begin to see life as a child and by returning to the adult world, remove the dangers we as adults have neglected to eliminate.

The final step suggests looking for lists and articles addressing items that need to be changed or eliminated to keep the home safe. One hint is to follow a trend being used in an increasing of stores and public gatherings—adding safety covers to all child-accessible electric outlets.

 

Walk The Yard

Sunday, 29 March 2015 13:03

As soon as the last of winter-spring snows melts, common sense dictates a safety requirement of “Walking the Yard” before the weather can produced one of the audible signs of spring—the easily recognized sound of a lawn mower.  This sound has a special safety significance.  This timely notice was explained by Newtown Square Fire Chief Doug Everlof when he volunteered, “It is time to walk your yard.”

Becauseof this year’s end-of-winter snows, the simple tour around the mowing areas can easily produce a surprising collection of items on the lawn. These forgotten and unknowns objects have accumulated between the last mowing between last year final mowing and now.  In explaining the importanceof this safety mandate, Chief Everlof stated, “Each of these objects can easily become a possible fatal or injurious missile when a mower passes over them.”

Even with the minimum possible damage, these flying objects can inflict serious injury, break windows, or dent siding or damage a parked car.  This ritual should not be only a once-a-yearpractice.  Looking before any mowing helps eliminate the possibility of yard items becoming dangerous to people,pets, and the property.  “Before mowing,please adopt this important and simple way of prevention,” urged NewtownTownship’s Fire Chief

 

Part-time Firefighter - EMT Positions Available

Thursday, 26 March 2015 21:27

The Newtown Square Fire Company No. 1 is actively hiring for the position of Firefighter - Emergency Medical Technician.

All interested individuals are requested to submit their resume and certificates for employment no later than April 15, 2015.

Applicants must possess the following certifications to be considered for employment with the Newtown Square Fire Company No.1:

Pennsylvania Firefighter I, Pro Board
Pennsylvania Firefighter II, Pro Board
Emergency Medical Technician (PA State) Basic Life Support (CPR for the Healthcare provider)
Emergency Vehicle Operators (EVOC) Course
Pump Operations I
Pump Operations II (recommended)
Aerial Operations
Hazard-Material Operations Level
NIMS 100, 200, 700, and 800
25 Years of Age
Child Abuse Act Clearance Certificate
Valid Pennsylvania Driver License

All Applicants are requested to send all resume and certificates to Chief @nsfc.org, or US mail to PO Box 453, Newtown Square, PA. 19073 Attention: Chief P. Douglas Everlof.

All resumes and certificates must be submitted by: 04/15/2015.
 

Much Appreciated Gift

Friday, 20 March 2015 16:31

Long gone is the opportunity of there being a White Christmas, but a recent, greatly appreciated event experienced by the Newtown Square Fire Company would have been appropriate at that holiday.  As the predicted snow began to fall at a fast and steady pace in that early March snow fall, the firefighters felt it was time to exercise a purchase plan.

Now knowing if that day’s snowfall were to be the final snow of the winter, the amount of the falling snow made that day’s decisions an easy choice.  Because of the large amount of the concrete leading from the fire station’s vehicle storage doors to the street, a hefty snow blower was needed.  Another ingredient in this decision was the removal of the large amount of slush deposited at the end of the concreate pad by passing vehicles on southbound North Newtown Street Road (PA 252).

In keeping with a Fire Company corporate policy of making local purchases whenever possible, Captain Mike Kenny visited Carl Niemeyer at the nearby Niemeyer Corporation.  Seeing the need and having a fitting snow blower available, Mr. Niemeyer surprised the Fire Company with the gift of this needed safety item.

When thanked for this community outreach, Niemeyer volunteered he was continuing a policy begun by his father.  The deceased senior Niemeyer believed through cooperation of this nature, Newtown Square has had a historical image of community based activities and support.  As the region was “celebrating” the first day of spring, the Newtown Square Fire Company was prepared to meet the challenge of this hoped-for final snow of the winter.

The massive snowfall falls of March were easily removed by Newtown Square Fire Company crews thanks to the snow-managing snow blower recently received as a gift from the Fire Company’s neighbor the Niemeyer Corporation. Newtown Square FireFoto

 

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Run Statistics

Run Statistics

2015 Calls
January: 50
February:
2014 Total 689
2013 Total 685
2012 Total 728
2011 Total 755
2010 Total 707
2009 Total 582
2008 Total 616
2007 Total 547

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Latest Biddle's Corner

Smoker Danger

Chief Doug Everlof has asked that smokers please practice their own fire prevention campaign by paying attention to where and how they discard cigarettes. A common landscaping mulch consists of colored wood chips.

Normal rainfall aid in preventing fires from discarded cigarettes, but this natural fire prevention help can be partially eliminated by long spells of rain-free weather. The thoughtful and proper discarding of individual “spent” cigarettes will help eliminate this documented danger.

Chief Everlof volunteered, "Fire prevention is everyone’s responsibility.  Please change smoking habits.   Don’t just throw a cigarette butt out a window or drop it to the ground. The unseen burning of a cigarette can start a threatening fire. Fire prevention is easy if it is practiced.”

 
Safety Tips For Home

Unlike adults the curious minds of children rarely “see” dangers in and around a home. The Newtown Square Fire Company stresses there are at least four ways to help adults modify a home for the safety of children. The simplest method is crawling on the floor. From this vantage, an adult can view the same world as seen by a child—seeing the temptations created by the curiosity children.

A second method is to watch what children do both in play and general activities. As a father of older children, Chief Doug Everlof remembers, “They are too young to know about the dangers in life.” Often demonstrated by their climbing, children love to explore. Their mountains can be as simple as an open oven door, an easily opened chest of drawers, or a chair that gives access to climbing to see a wanted item.

Newer stoves include methods to anchor them to a wall, preventing them from tipping over. Homeowners can create ways to anchor tippable furniture. Another safety suggestion is remove heavy objects like a television set from the top of a chest of drawers. A similar suggestion is a reminder to place heavy storable items in the lowest drawer.

Chief Everlof volunteered, “According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, every two weeks a child dies in our country from furniture, appliances or TVs tipping over. Each of us can help prevent these tragedies and make our homes a safer place.

A third method may be the most difficult. With maturity, adults see life in different ways than children. Try to ‘look back’ and begin to see life as a child and by returning to the adult world, remove the dangers we as adults have neglected to eliminate.

The final step suggests looking for lists and articles addressing items that need to be changed or eliminated to keep the home safe. One hint is to follow a trend being used in an increasing of stores and public gatherings—adding safety covers to all child-accessible electric outlets.